AgrAbility Webinar: Smart technology in agriculture & the home

AgrAbility logo

Smart technology in agriculture & the home: what is it and what is its impact on safety and efficiency?

Wednesday, April 8, 2020
3:00 – 4:00 p.m. EDT

Program Description

“Smart technology” is an umbrella term that encompasses many devices designed to make life easier for the user. Common types of smart technologies include watches, televisions, and a wide variety of other home devices (some that even respond to their own names). While marketed to the masses as the “next big thing,” for some individuals these devices can restore their independence and, in certain cases, even be life-saving. Whether the smart technologies are worn on the body or remain stationary, they can help prevent accidents from happening or assist in contacting emergency services if a crisis should occur. This webinar will discuss how smart technologies can benefit agricultural workers in the workplace and in the home.

Webinar topics include:

  • Types of smart technologies
  • Wearable devices
  • Home devices
  • Implications for agriculture
  • Implications for individuals with disabilities

Presenter

Luke Cain is a student from Indiana Wesleyan University’s occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) program. He is currently completing his residency project with AgrAbility with a focus on advocacy for the program and for agriculture workers with disabilities. He graduated from Indiana Wesleyan University in 2017 with a bachelor’s degree in exercise science and will be graduating from OTD school in April 2020. Luke is passionate about helping individuals with disabilities receive the therapy, education, and any other services they may need to help them meet their goals and be as independent as possible.

A question & answer period will follow the presentation.

Registration

To participate in this free webinar, click here to access the online registration form by Friday, April 3. Instructions for accessing the session will be sent to registrants by Monday, April 6. Please pass on this invitation to others you believe may be interested. Contact AgrAbility at 800-825-4264 or email agrability@agrability.org if you have questions.

 

ATIA Offers Free Webinars

ATIA, the Assistive Technology Industry Association, has announced that because of the COVID-19 outbreak they will be offering a series of free webinars:

ATIA recognizes that you have questions regarding COVID-19 (Coronavirus) and its implications on the assistive technology community. Below is an ongoing list of free webinars in the ATIA Learning Center and resources you can use to learn relevant information and insight from your peers.

This series is just one of the ways ATIA is sharing relevant educational content with our community. We’ll continue to update this page as new webinars are added. If you have a resource, tool or idea you would like to share as part of this webinar series, please fill out this form.

These live courses are presented by your AT community and are free for anyone and everyone. Each course will be recorded for you to access at any time.

Carefully Curating Apps and Software for Young Children-Managing Increased Screen Time
Tuesday, April 7 at 12:00pm CDT/1:00pm EDT
Beth Poss, Speech/Language Pathologist, AT Consultant
Presented by ATIA Member: LessonPix
This presentation will review popular apps and other digital resources using a checklist that outlines what makes an effective app based on research and guidance from respected authorities including the American Pediatric Association, and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

Supporting Remote Learning with Microsoft Learning Tools
Thursday, April 9 at 11:00am CDT/12:00pm EDT
Rachel Berger, AT Specialist
Presented by ATIA Member: Microsoft
This presentation will showcase Microsoft’s free Learning Tools that can be used to support student engagement and accessibility for users with learning differences.

Recording Online Content
Thursday, April 9 at 1:00pm CDT/2:00pm EDT
Liam Kelly, Manager of North American Sales, Note Taking Express
Presented by ATIA Member: Note Taking Express
This session explores the inbuilt features of Windows, iPhone, iPad and Macbooks that can capture the screens and audio, along with different ideas for recording content.

Supporting Students and Employees with Dyslexia at Home
Tuesday, April 14 at 11:00am CDT/12:00pm EDT
Chris Hughes, Founder, Present Pal; Cara Hunt, Head of Marketing, Present Pal; Euan Colley, Head of Product, Present Pal
Presented by ATIA Member: Present Pal
This course is an informal discussion about strategies and tools that students and employees with dyslexia can use to support themselves while working/studying from home.

AAC Language Lab Implementation Strategies
Wednesday, April 15 at 11:00am CDT/12:00pm EDT
Jane Odom, M.Ed
Presented by ATIA Member: PRC-Saltillo
The AAC Language Lab is now free. This session will dive into how to determine where to start, what is available and how to navigate all the lesson plans, activities and resources.

For more information, please visit the ATIA website…

Maine AgrAbility video highlights students’ learning on the farm

Buxton, Maine — Over the past year, Maine AgrAbility and partner Alpha One integrated agriculture into the curriculum of a peer mentoring program at Massabesic High School in York county. The program, funded by the Maine Department of Labor Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and supplemented with hands-on opportunities, culminated with summer work experiences on a local farm.

Sally Farrell, owner of Rummler Run farm in Buxton and former University of Maine Cooperative Extension 4-H professional in York County, agreed to introduce three of the students to daily life on her farm in summer 2019. The stories and experiences of those three students — practicing problem-solving, handling small livestock, helping ensure biosecurity practices — are told in the video “On the Farm.”

Maine AgrAbility, a collaborative project of UMaine Extension and Alpha One, is dedicated to helping farmers, fishermen and forest workers work safely and more productively. For more information, contact Leilani Carlson at 207.944.1533; leilani.carlson@maine.edu.

More information also is available on the UMaine Extension AgrAbility website.

About University of Maine Cooperative Extension:

As a trusted resource for over 100 years, University of Maine Cooperative Extension has supported UMaine’s land and sea grant public education role by conducting community-driven, research-based programs in every Maine county. UMaine Extension helps support, sustain and grow the food-based economy. It is the only entity in our state that touches every aspect of the Maine Food System, where policy, research, production, processing, commerce, nutrition, and food security and safety are integral and interrelated. UMaine Extension also conducts the most successful out-of-school youth educational program in Maine through 4-H.

April 2020 Webinars

Maine CITE is offering the following webinars in April

Everyday Assistive Technology for People with Serious Mental Illness – Refresh

computer keyboardDate: April 1, 2020
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 pm ET

This is an update and revision of a 2017 webinar of the same name. Dr. Gitlow was kind enough to return to discuss the latest information on this important topic.

People with serious mental illness often experience difficulties comprehending, processing new information and acting appropriately. Common issue include difficulty with attention, concentration, memory, and the ability to plan activities.

In this webinar, we Identify common psychosocial motor, cognitive, contextual, and environmental barriers which may interfere with the use of Assistive Technology (AT) and everyday technology (EDT) among individuals with SMI.

Presenter

  • Lynn Gitlow

Use this link for more information and to register for the Webinar: EveryDay Assistive Technology for people with Serious Mental Illness…


The following list of April 2020 webinars on the topic of assistive technology and accessibility is generated by the Accessible Technology Consortia funded by the Center for Accessible Technology. Thank you.

Creating High-Quality and Accessible Video from AEM
April 6, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

Learn AAC : AAC Resources in 4 Languages! From USSAAC
April 6, 2020 at 7:00 pm EST

We’re All in This Together: Four Cs for Supporting All Learners in the COVID-19 Crisis from AEM
April 7, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

Creating Accessible Documents and Slide Decks from AEM
April 13, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

Making Math Notation Accessible from AEM
April 21, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

Basics of Remediating an Inaccessible PDF from AT3
April 21, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

Aidan’s Path to Braille – An Alternative Approach to Literacy from TSBVI
April 1, 2020 at 4:00 pm EST

UDL in Action: Practical Ideas for the Classroom from SETC
April 2, 2020 at 6:30 pm EST

Learning Ally: Motivating Struggling Readers Through Literature from SETC
April 8, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

AAC Eval Genie: An Overview from SETC
April 9, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

GoTalkNow: A Tool for Literacy Instruction for all Learners from SETC
April 14, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

Unleashing the Power of UDL: Top Digital Tools for the Inclusive Classroom! From AbleNet
April 15, 2020 at 2:00 pm EST

AAC: Introduction to CoughDrop from SETC
April 21, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

Working w/Students Using Switches: New and Emerging Technologies! from SETC
April 22, 2020 at 6:30 pm EST

AAC: Introduction to Speak for Yourself from SETC
April 28, 2020 at 3:00 pm EST

 

Google Teach From Home

Google logoIn response to the rapidly changing educational landscape, Google has created a new resource for teachers Teach from Home. The new web resource is available in eleven languages and provides teachers with answers to many questions and links to make additional resources found on their Google in Education service. There is a complete section on accessibility that describes how to turn on and use access features in Chrome and on Chromebooks.

The Teach From Home resource is also available to download (in PDF) for teachers who have limited access to the internet.

Google has also created a complementary resources, Learn @ Home a guide for parents and guardians.  Google partnered with learning creators to bring parents and families meaningful resources and activities. These resources are not meant to replace homework assigned by teachers, but meant to complement that work.

Use this link to visit Teach From Home

 

AEM Center offers series of training on accessibility in distance learning

The AEM Center at CAST is offering free webinars on access and distance education for educators, parents, and those involved in remote instruction.

The series of six webinar, beginning on March 30, 2020 are designed to help educators who are now offering all of their lessons online – and parents – to support learners with disabilities, particularly those who use Assistive Technology (AT) and need Accessible Educational Materials (AEM).

Topics and dates are as follows:

Webinar 1: Personalizing the Reading Experience 
Monday, March 30, 2020 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET

Webinar 2: Creating High-Quality and Accessible Video
Monday, April 6, 2020 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET

Webinar 3: We’re All in This Together: Four Cs for Supporting All Learners in the COVID-19 Crisis 
Tuesday, April 7, 2020 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET

Webinar 4: Creating Accessible Documents and Slide Decks
Monday, April 13, 2020 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET

Webinar 5: We’re All in this Together: Communication and Collaboration In-the-Trenches
Tuesday, April 14, 2020 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET

Webinar 6: Making Math Notation Accessible
Tuesday, April 21, 2020 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET

For those unable to attend the live sessions, all webinars will be recorded and archived.

Use this link to read complete program descriptions and sign up…

Supporting Students with IEPs During eLearning Days

With schools across the country forced into the situation of closing and providing services to students via distance education, this webinar focused on the specific educational and technical needs of students with IEPs. Particular emphasis was paid to supporting students who use Assistive Technologies (AT) and Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) and the importance of ensuring distance learning systems work effectively with these. Resources and offers for technical assistance were described.

Due to high demand and a tremendous turn out, the live session on March 23rd was not available to most who registered for the event.

The recording from edWeb is now available to view at this link

Supporting Students with IEPs During eLearning Days was presented by Christine Fox, Deputy Executive Director, SETDA; Cynthia Curry, Director, National Center on Accessible Educational Materials and the Center on Inclusive Technology & Education Systems (CITES) at CAST; and Luis Perez, Technical Assistance Specialist, National Center on Accessible Educational Materials at CAST –

Don Johnston offers free software to schools

This announcement comes from Don Johnston, a company that makes assistive technology software, services and curriculum materials

As some of the most vulnerable students head home for eLearning, our role is to let our tools go to work helping students access learning—so they don’t miss a beat.

Whether you’re a current customer or a new customer, we’re here to help you provide essential accommodations and learning supports across your caseload or school district.

Fill out our online form, we’ll contact you with next steps. (This is a manual process, so it may take some time to get set up due to the increasing need.)

 

Freedom Scientific offers free licenses until June

Freedom Scientific is offering college students in the US and Canada a Free Home License of JAWS, ZoomText, or Fusion which will expire June 30, 2020.

If you are suddenly at home with no access to your AT software, we have you covered.

We know many of you must remain at home and will need to continue to work or attend school remotely. To ensure that your life remains accessible we are offering those in the US and Canada a Free Home License of JAWS, ZoomText, or Fusion which will expire June 30, 2020.

For those outside of North America, Freedom Scientific and our international distributors are working together to provide home solutions for our customers during the COVID-19 crisis. Please contact your states distributor if you need assistance connecting to school or work from home.

Use this link for more information…

 

Accessibility Tips for Teaching Online

Ordinarily, we would simply link the following article from the National Deaf Center entitled “5 Tips for Disability Service Professional to Provide Accessibility in Online Classes.” But in reviewing the PDF they produced as the handout, ironically it was not accessible. So, because it is important information, and does not bear any copyright mark, we are replicating it here.

The following comes from the National Deaf Center. Please contact them if you have questions about this content.

5 Tips for Disability Service Professionals to Provide Accessibility in Online  Classes

Disability service professionals are on the front lines — bringing their specialized knowledge, unique strengths, and necessary insights — to ensure that all classes are accessible to deaf and hard of hearing students as colleges and schools move them online in response to the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

These five tips from the National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes at the University of Texas at Austin can help them address access issues for deaf students who use assistive listening technology, American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters, speech-to-text services, captioned media, and more, as well as provide guidance to students, faculty members, and administration and leadership.

Tip 1: Communication is Key

  • Make sure accessibility is addressed on all levels of your institution . Your input is essential during this transition to online classes.
  • Share these 10 Tips for Educators with all faculty members, adjunct instructors, and anybody teaching online at your institution.
  • Inform current students how they can update their accommodation plans with your office. What may have worked for deaf students in person may not work online.
  • Students who may not have had accommodations before may need them now. Research shows only half of deaf college students file documentation or request accommodations. Let all students know how to connect with your office for support if they experience any unexpected challenges.

Tip 2: Remain Flexible When Re-evaluating Accommodations

  • It won’t be a ‘one-size-fits-all’. Deaf undergraduates encompass a range of identities , vary in communication preferences, and 50% have additional disabilities.
  • Accommodations for synchronous (everyone online at the same time) versus asynchronous (at your own pace) style courses will vary and may require more than one accommodation.
  • Consider the most common accommodations used by deaf students and how they can continue in online courses.

Tip 3: Don’t Cancel Service Providers

  • Consistent service providers are critical for deaf students. The classroom providers assigned to the face-to-face version of the course should continue providing services in the online course. Vocabulary and other signed concepts may already be established between the student and the interpreters, while speech-to-text professionals may already have a dictionary of specific terminology prepared.
  • Interpreters and speech-to-text professionals cannot be replaced by auto-generated captions for real-time communication needs. This does not provide equal access.
  • Consider having on-call interpreters and speech-to-text providers available during business hours to provide services for office hours, tutoring, student group meetings, walk-in advising appointments, or other ad hoc needs. These services can be available remotely. Ask your service provider for ways to meet this need.

Tip 4: Prepare Protocols for Captioning Media

  • Establish a procedure and priority list for videos, pre-recorded lectures, and other media in need of captioning. The courts recently ruled that appropriately captioned media provides equal access to students as required by law. Be wary of relying on any program that uses auto-generated captions for videos.
  • Provide faculty guidelines on where to find existing captioned videos. This will help reduce the influx of requests needed. Ask if the library or other departments can assist with finding accessible instructional materials.
  • If you need to caption a video or pre-recorded lecture, consider using a combination of both in-house staff or contact a captioning vendor. Staff can follow industry standards and use DIY captioning resources.

Tip 5: Manage Technology, Equipment, and Troubleshooting

  • Service providers may need to be granted access to your college’s learning management system (LMS), such as Canvas or Blackboard, or other videoconferencing and online resources. Work with your institution and service providers on how to access platforms.
  • If students or service providers need additional devices or access to software, plan on allocating resources to temporarily loan equipment. Ask students and providers what devices they may have available for accessing online coursework (computer/laptop, tablets, smartphones, etc).
  • As a backup, ask faculty to record virtual meetings and lectures, in case issues with internet connection, technology, or accommodations arise.
  • When online classes begin, check in with deaf students after the first week in case there are unanticipated barriers
  • Share these tips with your colleagues, administrators, and faculty. Let them know how you are planning to make your campus accessible, and how they can too. Now is the time to come together as a disability services community, support each other, and make sure everyone is involved in ensuring  accessibility.

Have Questions? Contact NDC Today!

The National Deaf Center provides year-round support to faculty, disability services professionals, deaf students and their families, and service providers. We are here for you!