New Free Module for Teacher Prep Programs

high school studentsThe following announcement comes from the Center on Technology and Disability (CTD)

CTD has created an Assistive Technology Module for Personnel Preparation Programs in participating colleges and universities and is now making it available to all educators and trainers interested in a “ resource package”. The resources can be downloaded and copied or distributed electronically at this unique link.

According to the announcement, the materials in this module will help students in teacher preparation programs:

  • Understand the basic concepts underlying the use of assistive technology.
  • Become familiar with the words and terms associated with AT.
  • Understand your role as a teacher in helping to identify and integrate the use of appropriate AT
    in your classroom.
  • Learn about the laws governing AT in public schools.
  • Participate as a knowledgeable professional in the IEP teams to which you will be assigned.
  • Become a role model, peer mentor, and school leader in the use of AT.
  • Change the lives of students with physical, sensory, cognitive, and emotional/behavioral disabilities.

In the same announcement, CTD offered another printed (PDF) resource entitled, Assistive Technology in the Classroom: Examples Designed to Help Teachers and Other School Personnel. This resource provides several case studies and offers discussion group questions for students in teacher preparation programs to use to help identify appropriate assistive technology devices and services.

Please use this link for more information and to access the resources…

 

Webinars – February 2019

Maine CITE is offering two free webinars in early February

Accessible Information TechnologyOn Feb 6th, Henry Powell from Alpha One will discuss Maine’s Adaptive Equipment Loan Program including the application process and loan eligibility. Maine’s Adaptive Equipment Loan Program offers cash loans that increase the purchasing power of people with disabilities, seniors and families in Maine. Use this link for more information and to register for the webinar “Maine’s Adaptive Equipment Financing Program”

And on Feb 7th, Chelsea Natale staff member of Gallant Therapy Services will present Assistive Technology for Independence in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Strong ADL skills are key to maximizing the function of individuals with disabilities enabling them to live more safely in their communities. Use this link for more information and to register for the webinar “Assistive Technology for Independence in ADLs”

Other February Webinars

The following list comes from the Accessible Technology Coalition. Use this link to sign up for their mailing list.

Web Accessibility in a Nutshell from ADA Southeast
Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 1:00 pm ET (30 min.)

Web Accessibility Update: Ruling Reversals, Insights, and Tips from Blackboard
Thursday, February 14, 2019 at 3:00 pm ET

SETC webinars are at 6:30 pm Eastern unless noted.
February 5     Proloquo2go App
February 7     Designing UDL lessons using the Google Chrome Platform
February 12   AAC 101 for Paraeducators: Speaking the Vocabulary of AAC
February 13   AT/AAC in the IEP: Accommodations, Assessments, Tools, When does a UDL become AT?
February 14    AT Chatter: UDL Implementation and Resources  at 11:30AM
February 20    CCN/Complex Bodies: Building meaningfully activities with switch users/AAC for older students looking at transition
February 21    Assessment Accommodations
February 25    Getting Bookshare Up and Running in Your District
February 28    Implementing PODD in a Life Skills Classroom

 

UMF Educator Preparation Program receives national and state accreditation

Loraine Spenciner
The late Lorraine Spenciner for whom the AT Library is named, shown her holding a modified keyboard.

FARMINGTON, ME —The University of Maine at Farmington (UMF) educator preparation program is proud to announce that it has received national accreditation from the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). UMF is the first institution in the state of Maine to meet the new, rigorous national accreditation standards. UMF has also received full approval for state accreditation, including several commendations, from the Maine State Board of Education.

A longtime leader in Maine and one of the premier teacher education programs in New England, the UMF program has been noted for providing pre-service teachers with a unique educational experience that maximizes career preparation and post-graduation success.

The CAEP review recognized the UMF program for providing students with effective learning opportunities in and out of the classroom that help prepare them for a career in teaching. The UMF program passed the rigorous peer review on all five CAEP standards, which are based on the principles that its graduates are competent, caring educators and its faculty have the capacity to maintain and enhance the quality of the professional programs.

CAEP is the sole nationally recognized accrediting body for educator preparation. UMF’s accreditation runs from 2018 to 2025.

Notably, CAEP recognized UMF for its strong relationship with the community and how this mutual commitment enriches the student experience through activities, resources and support for educational improvement. In addition, the review applauded the UMF teacher preparation program for the quality of its candidates from recruitment through certification.

UMF’s teacher preparation program provides students with field experience, early and often, with student teaching, practicum and internships boasting an average of 329 students in formal placements in schools around the state annually.

These experiences prepare educators for the real classroom and create a statewide demand for UMF graduates while helping to support educational partnerships at more than 130 Maine schools annually, not including early childhood and infant centers.

According to UMF’s 2018 teacher education unit alumni survey, 84 percent of respondents indicate being employed as a teacher in the field and a majority being hired within one year of graduation. In addition, 98.9 percent of graduates responding to the survey said they were very satisfied or satisfied with the UMF program.

In its overall approval of the UMF program, the Maine State Board of Education also commended UMF for its commitment to staff its educator preparation program with full time faculty. It observed that UMF is unique in the fact that all field supervisors who mentor and oversee pre-service teachers in schools around the state are full time faculty that can model the best in professional practices.

The Maine review also commended UMF for its dedication to assistive technology within the Spenciner Curriculum Materials Center. The center, connected to the Maine Department of Education’s Maine CITE Program, houses an extensive collection of assistive technology devices such as adaptive gaming controllers and 3-D printers that are available to loan to students, educators and the general public.

These resources can help all children, including those with disabilities, succeed in the classroom. The report noted the facility is “a remarkable resource for the students, faculty, and the larger community encouraging inclusive practice with state of the art materials and equipment.”

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally recognized public liberal arts college, UMF enjoys a 150-year tradition of providing a quality academic experience combined with the personal attention and close student / faculty collaboration that help prepare all students to be successful. Rooted in a tradition of teacher preparation, UMF offers top quality programs in the arts and sciences, teacher preparation, and business and pre-professional studies. UMF is located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region and is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.

The ATP Fundamentals Course offered

ATP - RESNA logoFrom RESNA (Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America)

The RESNA ATP Fundamentals Course will continue offering public, private on-site courses, and online, instructor-led courses designed as a convenient, cost-efficient and effective way for busy AT professionals to participate.

Register for the courses in January and March of 2019 or use your remaining training budget to purchase training vouchers today for a seat in 2019 – even book a private onsite class in 2018 to be held in 2019!

This training course will help candidates review and refresh their assistive technology knowledge and help identify areas they need to study for the ATP exam.

Course features:

  • Official RESNA course materials
  • Taught by a RESNA-authorized instructor and ATP
  • Collaborate with classmates
  • Real-world learning activities and scenarios
  • Access to online practice exam – complete with diagnostic scoring
  • Copy of “Fundamentals of Assistive Technology, Vol. 4”

The 16-hour curriculum will be covered over four weeks, consisting of eight 2-hour online evening class sessions. All class sessions will be recorded for easy viewing/reviewing over the duration of the class and for 90 days after the completion of the course.

Course Cost

January 8 – January 31, 2019

  • $650 – RESNA Member
  • $800 – RESNA Non-Member

March 11 – April 3, 2019

  • $650 – RESNA Member
  • $800 – RESNA Non-Member

Class size is capped at 45 students to allow for maximum interaction and knowledge transfer, so seating is very limited.

Registration and More Information

Use this link for more information and to register for these courses…

Group formed to test and document assistive technologies

ARIA W3C logoThe W3C – World Wide Web Consortia – has created a community group to systematically test and document  assistive technologies use of ARIA and HTML5 accessibility features in web applications. W3C membership is NOT needed to participate in the community group.

How WAI-ARIA is supported by assistive technologies, such as screen readers, is highly variable. This variation in WAI-ARIA rendering adds unnecessary complexity to the development of high-quality web experiences for users of assistive technologies and places significant limitations on the types of web widgets that can be made widely accessible.

This community group is dedicated to:

  1. Helping assistive technology developers converge on a set of clear norms for baseline support of WAI-ARIA.
  2. Helping web developers understand the current state of support for WAI-ARIA by assistive technologies.

WAI-ARIA is as important to assistive technology presentation as CSS is to visual presentation. Join us to help make WAI-ARIA as reliable as CSS.

In order to join the group, you will need a W3C account. Please note, however, that W3C Membership is not required to join a Community Group. Complete details may be found at this link…

This is a community initiative. This group was originally proposed on 2018-11-30 by Matthew King. The following people supported its creation: Matthew King, Laura Fathauer, Shadi Abou-Zahra, David Sexton, Mark McCarthy, Aaron Leventhal. W3C’s hosting of this group does not imply endorsement of the activities.

 

Let’s participate – new resource for infants and pre-schoolers

Early childhoodThe Let’s Participate! project, funded by the Office of Special Education Programs, was designed to help infants, toddlers and preschoolers with disabilities participate more fully in everyday activities through the use of assistive technology (AT).

Let’s Participate’s newly revamped website is chock-full of information on using AT with young children.

Please check out letsparticipate.org to find:

  • Numerous ready-to-be-used powerpoints and trainings
  • One-pagers on finding the right AT
  • A simple child-specific AT Plan
  • Resources on how to increase infant, toddler & preschooler participation using AT
  • Guidance on how/why to set up an AT lending library
  • Lots of tip sheets, activities, examples and more!

Use this link to visit Let’s Participate…

Photo credit: Image licensed through Creative Commons by Free Stock Photo

Resources to Support Adaption of Assistive and Instructional Technology

The Center on Technology and Disabilities (CTD) recently published a newsletter highlighting some of their publications related to education. Among those resources:

Implement Assistive Technology and Instructional Technology

EducationFuture Ready Assistive Technology: Fostering State Supports for Students with Disabilities – This report provides insights into the current state and future of assistive technology as well as resources to support your work.

AT and IT: Where are we headed? – This new infographic outlines the technology landscape, and what it means for state and district leaders, and teachers.

Technology Implementation Strategies that Work! – Watch this video series to learn more about the critical processes necessary to effectively support technology implementation in your district or school.

Understanding Assistive Technology: Policy and Implications for State Leaders – Assistive technology (AT) is an essential part of your overall technology plan. Watch this webinar to learn more about the legal requirements for AT, different types of AT supports, and the role of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).

Contact the CTD Technical Assistance Lead for SEA/LEA support, Kristin Ruedel – KRuedel@air.org.

For more information, visit CTD on the web!

GetATStuff website closing

Assistive Technology Exchange in New England & New York - Get AT StuffAfter ten years of service, the Maine CITE Coordinating Center along with the New York and New England Assistive Technology State programs have decided to close the Get AT Stuff Assistive Technology Exchange at the end of September 2018.

No new postings will be accepted after September 20th and the GetATStuff.com website will be closed on September 30, 2018. All postings to sell or give away AT equipment listed on GetATStuff.com will be removed on September 30 and all personal information deleted from the system.

Here are some options for donating or selling your used AT/equipment:

Additional resources and information are located on our Equipment Reuse page…

For further assistance please contact the Maine CITE Coordinating Center at 207-621-3195 V or Maine Relay 711.

 

Tech4Good Awards 2018

From E-Access Bulletin, July 2018…

From smartwatch wayfinders to robot farmers…

Tablet showing the definition of the word "access"Earlier in July, the AbilityNet Tech4Good Awards took place in London, showcasing everything from tiny farming robots to an innovative new way of contacting emergency services.

Now in its eighth year, the event was created by technology access charity AbilityNet to celebrate digital technology projects designed to improve people’s lives and benefit society. Entries can be new or existing ideas, and can come from anyone, such as a charity, business or individual.

In 2016, for example, nine-year-old Arnav Sharma won the Tech4Good People’s Award for his asthma-managing digital device, the AsthmaPi, while in this year’s event, projects from Microsoft and Facebook both made the finals.

Awards are split into nine categories, each highlighting a different strand of digital innovation: accessibility; connected society; young pioneer; ‘Tech4Good for Africa’; community impact; digital health; digital skills; digital volunteer of the year, and; community impact.

A panel of 23 judges from across the technology and charity sectors selected 28 finalists chosen from over 250 entries, while the final category – the People’s Award – was chosen by the public.

Here’s a rundown of this year’s winners.

The AbilityNet Accessibility Award was won by Be My Eyes, a free app for iOS and Android designed to help people with sight loss live more independently by assisting them in completing everyday tasks.

The app works by connecting visually impaired users to sighted volunteers via video link. The volunteers then answer questions from the user, who might want to know, for example, whether the date on a food expiry label has passed, or what a nearby road sign says.

An additional feature is ‘Specialized Help’, which lets companies use Be My Eyes to provide tailored customer service to users with a visual impairment. Users can contact the Microsoft Disability Desk directly through the app to ask for help with Microsoft products.

As reported in e-Access Bulletin earlier this year, Be My Eyes has announced a partnership with transportation app Moovit, to help people with sight loss use public transport around cities.

The winner of the Digital Health Award was TapSOS, a non-verbal method of contacting emergency services through an app. Designed primarily for people who are deaf, hard of hearing, speech impaired, or in a situation where it’s difficult to speak, TapSOS lets users set up a profile with their medical history, which gets shared with emergency services when the user contacts them. GPS provides a caller’s exact location to emergency services, making it easier to send out a response vehicle.

Small Robot Company won the Connected Society Award for their miniature farm robots, designed to automate elements of the planting, feeding, watering and weeding process on a farm in a lightweight, environmentally friendly and cost-effective way.

The Water Watcher was the winner of the BT Young Pioneer Award. The device fits on to a tap and uses an alarm and timer system to alert users if the tap has been left on too long. Powered by a simple BBC Micro:bit computer (a winner in the 2016 Tech4Good Awards), the Water Watcher is particularly useful for people with dementia or dyslexia.

The Unlocking Talent Through Technology scheme, which provides solar-powered tablet computers and literacy apps for schools in Malawi, won the Comic Relief Tech4Good for Africa Award. Led by international development organisation VSO, the Unlocking Talent programme has reached 90,000 schoolchildren so far, and has been integrated into Malawi’s National Education Policy framework.

The Community Impact Award was won by MOMO (Mind of My Own), an app to help keep children and young people safe. MOMO encourages users to record thoughts, feelings and observations, which can help them communicate about difficult or dangerous situations which they might not feel able to discuss elsewhere.

A ‘wayfinding’ app for people with learning impairments was voted for by the public to win the Tech4Good People’s Award. WaytoB helps guide users who may not be able to fully operate other navigation or mapping systems. The app works through a smartwatch, giving users clear directions on a specified journey, and letting them know when to cross a road or which bus to catch, for example.

Crucially, WaytoB is used in harmony by a ‘navigator’ and ‘partner’, such as a family member or friend. Journeys are pre-programmed by the ‘partner’, who can track where the navigator is through the app.

The Digital Skills Award was won by Generation Code, a national scheme to help develop coding skills in young people around the UK. People aged 16-25 who already have coding knowledge are trained to become ‘Code Champions’, who then provide coding activities to people aged 11-19 in their local area.

The importance of coding was also recognised in the Digital Volunteer of the Year Award, presented to Anna Holland Smith. Anna is involved with a number of inclusive coding initiatives, including Manchester’s Codebar, which provides programming opportunities for underrepresented groups.

Read more about all of this year’s winners and other projects at the Tech4Good Awards website…


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Photo Credit: Image licensed through Creative Commons by The Blue Diamond

Maine DOE Announces Award for Management of Assistive Technology

From the Maine DOE…

Maine CITE Coordinating Center logoAUGUSTA July 17, 2018 – The Maine Department of Education is pleased to announce that Maine CITE Coordinating Center has been awarded a grant to provide management of assistive technology (AT) services under the federal Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (ATA).

The Maine CITE Coordinating Center has served as the ATA Grant Manager since the federal law was enacted in 1989. Maine CITE oversees a statewide effort to get assistive technology (AT) to people of all ages with disabilities who need it through device demonstrations, device loans and AT reuse. Maine CITE also provides public awareness, information and referral, and training and technical assistance on AT.

Kathy Adams OTL, ATP the Director of the Maine CITE Coordinating Center said, “we are very pleased to be awarded this grant. AT can be essential in education, employment, community living and telecommunications. We renew our commitment to assisting Maine citizens with disabilities to learn about and get the AT they need and want to lead productive independent lives.”

Under this grant, Maine CITE will continue to support the needs of Maine students with print disabilities through the Maine Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) Program as required under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004. The statewide Maine AEM Program works to improve students’ access to AEM and to facilitate the use of AT.

Jan Breton, Director of Special Services Birth – 20 said, “we are very pleased to continue working with Maine CITE which has demonstrated over many years its commitment to expanding and supporting the use of technology to assist people with disabilities.”

For details about Assistive Technology (AT) and the Maine Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) Program visit mainecite.org or maine-aem.org.

For information on AT demonstrations and loans visit at4maine.org.