What is Sprint IP Relay and Sprint Web CapTel?

The following comes from Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS)

Community Zoom presentation: What is Sprint IP Relay and Sprint Web CapTel?

DATE: Thursday, August 13, 2020 
TIME: 1-2 p.m.

Person using Web Cap Tel serviceSprint IP Relay: You can make calls with Sprint IP Relay on your smartphone, tablet or computer to type and view messages. This relay service allows the user to make phone calls using text (no voice or hearing required). How does it work? You type what you want to say to the operator, and then the operator relays the message to your caller and types their response back to you. Complete a quick registration and start making calls!  

Sprint Web CapTel: This relay service works a little different; you can use any telephone and connect via computer/tablet to read captions on the call. Using the telephone allows you to use your own voice. Use this link to register for this relay service…

How to Attend

To join the Zoom meeting and learn about these two no-cost relay services available to Maine residents, please contact Debra Bare-Rogers DRogers@DRME.org for the link to the meeting.

If you are hard of hearing or deaf and need captioning during this presentation Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) will be set-up for this event. Please send an email to DRogers@DRME.org for the captioning link.

 

Webinar on Accessible Virtual Meeting Platforms

Recording Available of Webinar on Accessible Virtual Meeting Platforms

US Access Board logoThe U.S. Access Board recently (July 21, 2020) conducted a webinar on the accessibility of virtual meeting platforms as part of its Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series. Presenters from the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Communications Commission reviewed features and considerations for ensuring access to virtual platforms according to the Section 508 Standards. A recording of this free webinar – including handouts – is available on the webinar site. 

The Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series provides helpful information and best practices for federal agencies in meeting their obligations under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act which ensures access to information and communication technology in the federal sector. This webinar series is made available by the Accessibility Community of Practice of the CIO Council in partnership with the U.S. Access Board.

 

ADA Anniversary Update: 30 Years, Where do We Go Now?

The following announcement comes from Great Lakes ADA Center in collaboration with the ADA National Network…

The Great Lakes ADA Center in collaboration with the ADA National Network invites you to attend the July ADA Audio Conference Series session titled,

ADA Anniversary Update: 30 Years, Where do We go Now?

Date:   July 14th, 2020 
Time:  2-3:30 pm Eastern Time 

Cost:   No Charge

The session will feature:

  • Emily Ladau, Editor in Chief, Rooted in Rights Blog;
  • Maria Town, President and CEO, American Association of People with Disabilities;
  • Timotheus Gordon, Jr., Researcher-Activist, Institute on Disability and Human Development at UIC, Co-Founder (Chicagoland Disabled People of Color Coalition);
  • Jae Jin Pak, Community Education & Training Coordinator, Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois Chicago;

Session Description:

On July 26th, 1990, President George H. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The intent of the ADA was to provide persons with disabilities Equality of opportunity, Full participation, Independent living, and Economic self-sufficiency. Thirty years down the road what is the state of disability rights in the United States? Join us as our speakers look forward and discuss what needs to be done to further the rights of persons with disabilities and fulfill the goals of the ADA. Participants will have an opportunity to pose questions to our speakers.

This session is offered via the Zoom webinar platform. Captioning is available in the webinar room or via StreamText link.

Registration:  Advance Registration is required at the Accessibility Online website. Note: you will need to set up an account on our website if you do not have one already.

Questions:

877-232-1990 (V/TTY) or by email at webinars@ada-audio.org

 

2020 Guide for Maine Families on AT and AEM Published

EducationThe Maine CITE Assistive Technology Program is pleased to release the revised Guide for Maine Families on Assistive Technology and Accessible Educational Materials. The 2020 Guide provides Maine families who have children with disabilities an easy to use resource describing how to get the assistive technology (AT) devices and services they need. Information about accessible education materials (AEM) and families’ important role in the planning process are also provided.

The 2020 Guide updates general information about AT and AEM. It includes new resources about assistive technology used during “learning at home” activities, as well as AT device demonstration and loan services – AT4Maine.org.

Use this link to download the The Guide – PDF

Audio Description Project – Proposed Rulemaking

The following press release comes from the Audio Description Project of the American Council of the Blind (ACB):

On April 23, 2020, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that proposes expanding the number of broadcast designated market areas required to pass through audio description from the top 60 markets to the top 100, and to use the term “audio description” instead of the term “video description.”

The NPRM seeks to modernize the terminology in the Commission’s regulations to use the term “audio description” rather than “video description.” The term “audio description” is used by the rest of the federal government and is the term used in Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, “audio description” is the agreed upon international terminology for audibly describing the visual elements of videos, on-stage performances, and subjects at museum and art galleries.

On May 21, 2020, the Media Bureau of the FCC released a public notice announcing the NPRM comment due dates; comments are due June 22, 2020, and reply comments are due July 6, 2020. The text of the NPRM is available on the FCC website.

Interested parties may file comments on their own by accessing the Electronic Comment Filing System. All filings must reference MB Docket No. 11-43. People with disabilities who need assistance to file comments online may request assistance by email to FCC504@fcc.gov.

Read more about the plan to expand the number of broadcast designated market areas…

Read more about the Audio Description Project…

 

Happy Global Accessibility Awareness Day

Tablet showing the definition of the word "access"

Today, May 21, 2020, we celebrate the 9th anniversary of Global Accessibility Awareness Day – GAAD. Unlike previous years, when celebrations involved many face-to-face meetings and special events around the world, this year we celebrate virtually.

Check out some of the virtual events

Learn more about GAAD

Indeed the need to work and learn from home this year has intensified the importance of access for all in a powerful new way. Hopefully, now the message will be well-heard, remembered and action taken.

 

 

Audio Description Project Conference

Audio DescriptionThe American Council of the Blind (ACB) – Audio Description Project (ADP) will sponsor a Virtual Conference on July 3-10, 2020.

Here is the announcement:

This year’s Audio Description Project Conference will be held as a virtual conference (via Zoom) daily (except for Monday, July 5) starting July 3, 2020.  The cost to attend the ADP Zoom sessions will simply be the $25 fee required to register for the overarching ACB Conference.  Your $25 registration fee includes admission to all of the Audio Description Project events.

Registration will open on May 21 at 7:00 AM eastern time for ACB members and May 28 for nonmembers. Registration closes at 11:59 PM eastern time on June 21.

For more information and to register online use this link: acbconvention.org

Interested parties may also call (612) 332-3242 and select option 5 for convention. Your phone call will be returned as quickly as possible; leave your name, telephone number and time zone.

 

Q&A about captioning from NDC

Closed Caption feed on TV screenThe National Deaf Center on Post Secondary Outcomes (NDC) has recently been publishing a number of valuable resources regarding accessibility accommodations for people with deafness or hearing impairments. The latest comes in the form of a Q&A (questions and answers) with section that was particularly helpful. We picked this one to share, but please view the full resource and consider signing up for their newsletter.

Read the entire NDC Q&A resource

Captions – automatic, closed captions, real-time, transcription: What do these all mean?

Automatic captions – Also referred to as speech-recognition, automated captioning, or auto-captions, are generated by a computer with Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology. These captions tend to lack punctuation, speaker identification, and require a human to fix mistakes.

Many platforms include this feature, such as:

  • Video streaming platforms (i.e. YouTube automated captions or Microsoft PowerPoint Translator)
  • Apps (i.e., Translate or Otter.ai)
  • Learning Management Systems (i.e., Blackboard, Canvas)
  • Live video streaming services (i.e., Zoom, Google Meet)

Captions – Also referred to as open/closed captions or subtitles. These are captions for pre-recorded video content that are time-synced and embedded into the media. Accurate and edited captions provide equivalent access. Captions also provide auditory information that ASR technology may not be able to identify.

Real-time captioning – Also referred to as live captioning or speech-to-text services.  This service is provided by a qualified speech-to-text professional.  Examples: Live captioning for news broadcasts or by a third-party vendor streamed into Blackboard for a synchronous online class.

Transcribe/Transcription – Also referred to as a transcript. This process involves converting audio into a plain text document. Transcripts are commonly used for stand-alone audio, such as podcasts or presentations without video. They are also used as the first step towards creating captions for media. Transcripts can be auto-generated using ASR or by speech-to-text professionals.

 

Tips for Hosting Accessible Meetings with Deaf Participants

Accessibility pictogramThe National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes (NDC) has hosted a valuable set of tips for hosting meetings where some of the participants may be deaf or hard of hearing. They note, “besides running a better meeting, effective communication between hearing and deaf people has other benefits for career success. Research shows it strengthens relationships, increases well-being, and fosters meaningful participation in the workplace.”

Among the tips are recommendations regarding:

  • the use of captioning for any videos shared in the meeting,
  • the importance of providing the right accommodations – including in-person American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter, remote ASL interpreter, remote speech-to-text services, large print materials, and presentations slides as handouts with presenter notes, and
  • establishing some meeting ground rules, including taking turns, and identifying yourself before making comments.

The complete list of tips (PDF) may be downloaded from this link to the NDC website

In need of further assistance? Connect with the NDC Help Team

 

Corona Virus Statistics Website Accessible for the Blind and Partially Sighted

From Cool Blind Tech:

A Boston-based software developer wanted to make COVID-19 stats accessible

He created a website that would be easily readable by electronic braille readers and other assistive devices used by the blind and partially sighted.

Tyler Littlefield, a software developer based in Boston, has created a database of COVID-19 statistics meant to be accessible to the visually impaired.

Called CVStats.net, the site organizes up-to-date COVID-19 data in simple charts specifically designed to be legible to a range of aid devices the visually impaired use to access websites.

For Littlefield, and many other people with visual impairments, trying to stay updated during the COVID-19 pandemic has been a challenge because many of the commonly shared charts and graphs are inaccessible, including those from the CDC and Department of Public Health.

“For many people with various types of disabilities, graphics and the information conveyed in them is hard to read and understand,” Littlefield told Vice.

“I believe in the idea of open data, data that everyone can access to help make informed decisions. Finding this lack, I created CVStats to present the data to users in a straightforward way, free of ads, click-through news articles and graphics.”

One of the main obstacles in making COVID-19 information more accessible are the conventions of modern web design. With a profusion of autoplay videos, pop-up windows, and animated inserts, many modern websites make it difficult for braille embossers to scan a webpage and convert its content into a braille printout.

“Clutter is the enemy of tactical legibility,” Naomi Rosenberg of the accessibility firm Lighthouse told Vice.

“For each of these, a blind reader is at the mercy of the designer, writer, or educator to produce quality graphics, concise image descriptions, or properly formatted tables,” Rosenberg said.

One possible alternative to visual graphs are ‘sonification curves,’ which translate graph lines into rising and falling sounds to try and convey a similar sense of magnitude, something that an aid device won’t be able to do without simple and accessible data.

Another challenge, according to Sassy Outwater-Wright, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired, is that many healthcare facilities don’t post clear or accessible information about their policies.

For instance, some drive through testing sites only allow private vehicles, not taxis or other commercial vehicles, which would be important for a visually impaired person who can’t drive themselves to know before planning a visit.

“The moment that I heard everything was going drive-thru I kind of had a cringe moment because, other than in the hospital, there’s really no other way to access that testing, and for many in our community, including myself, who are immunocompromised, that puts us at a much higher risk,” Outwater-Wright said.

“We don’t get the benefit of staying in our car, we don’t get the benefit of trying to continue to social distance. We have to go in.”

For more information see Motherboard on Vice.com…