Webinars – December 2019

computer keyboardThe following is a list of December webinars on the topic of assistive technology and accessibility. The list is generated by the Accessible Technology Consortia funded by the Center for Accessible Technology. Thank you.

Advancing AT Processes: AT in the IEP from SETC
December 9, 2019 at 6:30 pm Eastern

(Job) Accommodations… Practical Solutions for Complex Needs from JAN
December 10, 2019 at 2:00 pm Eastern

I Have (an AAC) Device, Now What? from AbleNet
December 11, 2019 at 3:00 pm Eastern

 

road sign with word diabetes

Smartphones, “wearables” and diabetes management

ZD Net has published an interesting article about recent advances in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices that can be used with smartphones and wearable technology like the Apple Watch.

The article, Diabetes monitoring is having a smartwatch and smartphone revolution, notes the long standing problems (and expense) associated with blood glucose management in people with diabetes costing Americans $327 billion a year.

The article states:

Technology aimed at insulin-using diabetics became mainstream a few years back with the arrival of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices. These are small readers that sit on a diabetic’s body, taking their blood sugar levels constantly and relatively unobtrusively. This technology is transforming diabetes control for its users. By giving them a better view of what their blood glucose was doing, CGMs enabled insulin-dependent diabetics to take steps to keep readings in the right range.

One manufacturer of these devices Dexcom, is “… looking to exploit the potential of wearables and smartphones. Users can get their readings sent over Bluetooth Low Energy to hardware including iOS and Android phones and watches…” the article adds and ends with, “…the future of CGM is going to be tightly tied to the development of consumer tech like smartwatches or other wearables. ‘There’s a good possibility that you’re going to have even tighter integration than we have today with those types of products…'”

Read the entire article from ZD Net…

View Maine CITE’s webinar ‘Wearables’ as Assistive Technology…

 

Aphasia Caregiver Support Group Research Project

The University of Maine Communication Sciences and Disorders Program is seeking participants in an online aphasia caregiver support group as part of a research project. The purpose of the research project is to determine if caregivers of people with aphasia can benefit from participation in a telepractice aphasia caregiver support group.

People will meet with the group facilitator, guest speakers and other caregivers of people with aphasia from their home computers once a week for 12 weeks. Each meeting will last approximately 1 ½ to 2 hours.

Participants will also be asked to complete online questionnaires before the meetings begin, after the meetings have been completed and 3 months later.

For inclusion in this study, participants must:

  • be (at least) 21 years of age
  • be the primary caregiver and communication partner of person with aphasia
    for at least 1 year
  • have normal or corrected hearing and vision
  • have computer, laptop and/or tablet
  • have high-speed Internet access

For more information, please call Dr. Judy Walker at 581-2003 or email: judy.p.walker@maine.edu

 

Making Medication Management Smarter

Pill box with days of the weekIn a new posting by Laurie Orlov, Technology Can Help Make Medication Management Smarter, she reminds us that “…medication non-adherence (not filling prescriptions or missing dosages) is a major health issue resulting in 10% of hospitalizations, 125,000 deaths, and costing the healthcare system up to $300 billion/year.”

Orlov offers the following recommendations:

First, a simple app solution can help. Setting a calendar entry (no app required) or downloading a medication reminder app can help users avoid missing their medication. Free apps, like Pill Reminder (iPhone) and PillsOnTime (Android) also track missed doses. Tracker by Medisafe (iPhone and Android), not only reminds you when it’s time for a refill but enables you to track vitals like blood pressure. Davis’ Drug Guide (iPhone) even contains detailed drug information for patients who have questions about a drug, the possible side effects, or its interactions with other medications.

Next, medication dispensing pre-packaged containers can help with complex regimens. For some individuals, a plastic 7-day pill container provides enough structure. But if problems occur as a result of not taking doses, technology-enabled containers are designed to help prevent both missing a dose or taking the wrong pill. Units are easily connected to the Internet for communication to caregivers about whether the unit was opened at the right time. They include PillPack (recently acquired by Amazon) which delivers the packaged medication doses and has an accompanying app to track information about them.  Then there is MedMinder, an automated dispensing box that can be preloaded by the pharmacy.  PillPack and MedMinder charge just the co-pay medication cost. Finally, consider Philips’ Automated Medication Dispensing Service – in which a caregiver loads up to 40 days of doses which are dispensed in small cups per dose at a cost of $59.95 per month.

For more information

Read the entire article Technology Can Help Make Medication Management Smarter by Laurie Orlov…

View our June 2019 webinar Assistive Technology (AT) for Medication Management with Christine Martin…

Access Board to Assess Feasibility of Wheelchair Restraint Systems on Aircraft

From the US Access Board:

The inability to use one’s wheelchair on airplanes makes air travel very difficult, if not impossible, for many people with disabilities. It requires multiple transfers between boarding chairs and aircraft seats, posing injury risks. Airline seats are a poor alternative to personal wheelchairs which are typically customized for the user’s safety, comfort, and specific medical needs. Further, passengers’ wheelchairs are stowed in the cargo hold and often damaged, mishandled, or lost as a result.

To address these challenges, the Access Board is undertaking a study to assess the feasibility of equipping aircraft with restraint systems so that passengers can remain in their wheelchairs on flights. Congress directed the Board to study this question in its most recent reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration. The Board has enlisted the Transportation Research Board (TRB), which is part of the congressionally chartered National Academy of Sciences, to conduct this assessment and to issue a report. The Board and TRB will consult the Department of Transportation, aircraft manufacturers, air carriers, and disability advocates in the course of the study, as directed by the act.

“The Board is eager to examine this issue which has the potential to make flying safer and more comfortable for thousands of people who use wheelchairs,” stated Board Executive Director David Capozzi. “We look forward to building upon and advancing the work of other organizations who have provided critical leadership, advocacy, and research on this subject, notably All Wheels Up, Flying Disabled, and Paralyzed Veterans of America.”

TRB will organize an expert panel to assess and evaluate the feasibility of equipping passenger aircraft with in-cabin wheelchair restraint systems. This panel will include experts in aircraft manufacturing, aeronautics, aviation safety, accessibility, disability policy, airline operations, and other disciplines. It will examine the design, engineering, and safety requirements for equipping aircraft with locking or tiedown mechanisms for non-motorized and motorized wheelchairs used as seats. If such restraint systems are found to be feasible, the panel will then assess how they can be used to accommodate passengers using wheelchairs through all phases of flight, from boarding to deplaning. A peer-reviewed report on the panel’s findings will be published at the conclusion of the project and submitted to Congress. The report is expected by October 2021.

For further information on this study, contact Mario Damiani of the Access Board at (202) 272-0050 (voice), (202) 272-0066 (TTY), or damiani@access-board.gov.

Public Weighs in on Proposed Voluntary Guidelines for Aircraft Wheelchairs

In August, the Access Board released advisory guidelines for wheelchairs used on airplanes and made them available for public comment. These voluntary guidelines specify dimensions, features, and capabilities for wheelchairs used during flights to access aircraft lavatories. The guidelines address maneuverability, stowage, stability, back support, restraints, assist handles, and other details. The published notice also posed a number of technical questions to the public.

By the close of the 60-day comment period, the Board received over 40 comments from various interests and stakeholders, including people with disabilities, advocacy groups, aircraft manufacturers, trade associations, manufacturers of onboard wheelchairs, researchers, and others. In addition, the Board held a public hearing on the guidelines in September that provided an additional forum for submitting comment. The docket, which includes all submitted comments and hearing testimony, is available on regulations.gov.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) plans to supplement its regulations under the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to require onboard wheelchairs with enhanced functionality on certain single-aisle aircraft as part of a negotiated rulemaking (PDF) to improve access for air travelers with disabilities. The Board is developing these non-binding guidelines as technical assistance to air carriers and manufacturers of onboard wheelchairs by providing an example of how to meet DOT’s planned performance standards.

For further information on the Board’s development of these guidelines, contact Wendy Marshall at (202) 272-0043 (voice) or marshall@access-board.gov, or Mario Damiani (202) 272-0050 (voice) or damiani@access-board.gov.

State Plan on Aging offers “Listening Sessions”

Woman preparing a mealThe Maine Department of Health and Human Service – Office of Aging and Disability Services (OADS) wants to hear from older adults, adults with a physical disability, caregivers, pre-retirees, veterans and service providers to learn about their experiences!

As OADS begins to design a strategic plan to address our communities’ needs they are hosting eight sessions around the state (at the local Area Agency on Aging centers) to gather input on the priorities and strategies that are important to Maine citizens.

The Maine State Plan on Aging Listening Sessions are as follows:

Area Agency on Aging Center Date Time Location
Aroostook Agency on Aging 10/02/2019 2:00 – 4:00 PM Ashland Town Office
11 Bridgham St, Ashland
Spectrum Generations 10/08/2019 2:00 – 4:00 PM VFW Hall
50 Mill Street, Waldoboro
Eastern Area on Aging 10/15/2019 2:00 – 4:00 PM Eastern Area Agency on Aging
240 State St, Brewer
Spectrum Generations 10/16/2019 2:00 – 4:00 PM Spectrum Generations Muskie Center
38 Gold St, Waterville
Eastern Area on Aging 10/16/2019 2:00 – 4:00 PM University of Machias, Performing Arts Center
116 O’Brien Avenue Machias
Seniors PLus 10/22/2019 1:00 – 3:00 PM SeniorsPlus Offices
10 Falcon Rd, Lewiston
Seniors PLus 10/23/2019 1:00 – 3:00 PM Comfort Inn & Suites
1026 US-2, Wilton
Southern Maine Agency on Aging 10/24/2019 2:00 – 4:00 PM USM, Glickman Library, 7th Floor
314 Forest Ave, Portland

Questions

Please contact:

James Moorhead
Maine Department of Health and Human Services
Office of Aging and Disability Services

Phone: 207-287-9200
james.moorhead@maine.gov

Audio Description in Education – Student Contest

Benefits of Audio Description in Education Contest – “BADIE”

Young People Who Are Blind Write Reviews of Film and Video

Audio DescriptionSeptember 9, 2019 – The American Council of the Blind’s Audio Description Project (ACB-ADP) and the Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP) are continuing their co-sponsorship of an exciting opportunity for blind and visually impaired young people, in four categories from ages 7 to 21: the Benefits of Audio Description in Education (BADIE) contest.

Kids love movies!

Movies, videos, and other forms of multimedia are, these days, integral to public, private, and special education curriculum. If you’re a young person who can’t see or can’t see well, audio description provides access to all the visual images of the movies that sighted young people enjoy.

Students choose an audio-described film or video from the more than thousands of titles available through DCMP – visit www.dcmp.org. Or a young person who is blind can borrow an audio-described video or film from a library, and dozens of audio-described films videos are available for purchase through the ACB-ADP’s website.

How to enter the contest…

Reviews can be submitted in writing, in braille or via an audio recording.

Use this link to Register for the contest…

Entries can also be submitted via e-mail or postal mail (submissions from outside the United States are fine) to:

ACB-DCMP Benefits of Audio Description In Education
1703 N. Beauregard St., Suite 420
Alexandria, VA 22311 USA

E-mail: jsnyder@acb.org
Phone: (202) 467-5083

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: Friday, December 6, 2019

Contest winners in each category will be chosen by January of 2020, and the grand prize winner will receive an iPad Mini! Each first-place winner will receive a $100 iTunes gift card. Second-place winners will receive a $50 iTunes gift card, and third-place winners will receive a $25 iTunes gift card. Each supporting teacher who has a first-place winning student will be awarded a $100 Amazon gift card.

 

US Access Board Webinar – Accessible Rest Rooms

From the US Access Board:

U.S. Access Board Webinars: Accessible Toilet Rooms (Oct. 3) and Bathing Facilities (Oct. 24)

US Access Board logoMost technical questions that come up in using the ADA and ABA Accessibility Standards concern toilet and bathrooms. In October, the U.S. Access Board will conduct two webinars on accessible toilet and bathing facilities.

The first webinar will take place October 3 from 2:30 – 4:00 (ET) and will clarify common sources of confusion and frequently asked questions about accessible toilet rooms. Presenters will review requirements for toilets and toilet compartments, urinals, lavatories and mirrors, doors, turning space, dispensers, and amenities such as baby-changing tables. They will explain how these provisions apply and interrelate in designing single-user and multi-user toilet rooms in compliance with the standards.

It will be followed by a webinar on October 24 from 2:30 – 4:00 (ET) that will explain and clarify requirements for bathing facilities in the ADA and ABA Accessibility Standards. This session will address common questions and sources of confusion concerning transfer showers, roll-in-showers, and bathtubs. Presenters will review components of accessible bathing fixtures, including grab bars, shower and tub seats, shower spray units and controls, and clearances. They will show how these requirements and other provisions in the standards apply and come together in the design of accessible bathing facilities.

For more information or to register for both or either session, visit accessibilityonline.org

Questions can be submitted in advance of the sessions (total limited to 25 each) or can be posed during the live webinars. Webinar attendees can earn continuing education credits. The webinar series is hosted by the ADA National Network in cooperation with the Board. Archived copies of previous Board webinars are available on the site.

Groups Call on the FCC to Improve Quality of Live Captions

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Consumer Groups and Researchers Call on the FCC to Improve the Quality of Live Captions

Closed Captioning logoOn July 31, ten national organizations, including the National Association of the Deaf (NAD), the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA), and the Association of Late-Deafened Adults (ALDA), petitioned the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to address long-standing quality problems with captioning for live television programming. The petition was supported by the American Association of the DeafBlind (AADB).

As the petition explains, consumers routinely report serious problems with the accuracy, timing, completeness, and placement of captions on live programming, including local news, sports, and weather. The petition asks the FCC to build on its existing standards for the quality of captions by setting metrics for acceptable quality of live captions. The petition also urges the FCC to provide guidance for new captioning systems that use automatic speech recognition, which have the potential to provide captions with improved timing and lower cost but also routinely cause significant accuracy problems. Consumer groups and researchers also will be submitting additional feedback to the FCC, including an analysis of hundreds of consumer responses gathered by HLAA in a recent survey.

The FCC has asked for comments from the public about the petition. If you’ve had experiences with captions for live TV programming that you’re willing to share with the FCC, you can do so online.

Submit your comments to the FCC by September 13

Use this link to read the petition

Use this link to enter your comments online and remember to enter 05-231 in the “Proceeding(s)” field to make sure that your comment is added to the record.

 

Public Comment Wanted: Guidelines for Onboard Wheelchairs

U.S. Access Board Releases Voluntary Guidelines for Onboard Wheelchairs for Public Comment

US Access Board logoThe U.S. Access Board has released for public comment, advisory guidelines for wheelchairs used on commercial passenger aircraft during flight. These onboard wheelchairs are provided by air carriers as a means of facilitating the transfer of passengers with disabilities to aircraft lavatories since personal wheelchairs cannot be used in the cabin. The Department of Transportation (DOT) has expressed its intention to supplement its regulations under the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to include performance standards for onboard wheelchairs on covered aircraft. The Board is developing these non-binding guidelines as technical assistance to air carriers and manufacturers of onboard wheelchairs by providing an example of how to meet DOT’s planned performance standards.

As indicated in a notice published in the Federal Register, the guidelines specify dimensions, features, and capabilities for onboard wheelchairs that will allow passengers with disabilities to be more safely and comfortably transported aboard airplanes in flight. In addition, the guidelines include criteria to allow the onboard wheelchair to fully enter the lavatory in a backward orientation and be positioned over a closed toilet, and for the lavatory door to be closed. This feature would afford those passengers who cannot independently transfer to the toilet to have privacy in performing non-toileting tasks related to personal hygiene or medical needs. The Board has posed a number of questions to the public about specific provisions in the guidelines but welcomes input on all portions of the document.

As part of a negotiated rulemaking to improve access for air travelers with disabilities, DOT has put forth plans to supplement its ACAA regulations and require onboard wheelchairs with enhanced functionality on aircraft with more than 125 passenger seats.

Related information, including instructions for submitting comments, is posted at www.regulations.gov (Docket ATBCB-2019-0002).

Comments are due October 21, 2019. In addition, on September 12, 2019, the Board will hold a public hearing that will provide an opportunity to submit comments either in person or by phone. Further details will be posted on the Board’s website.

Those who wish to provide testimony at the hearing should contact Rose Marie Bunales at (202) 272-0006 (voice) or bunales@access-board.gov by September 5, 2019.

For further details on the guidelines or the public hearing, contact Wendy Marshall at (202) 272-0043 (voice) or marshall@access-board.gov, or Mario Damiani at (202) 272-0050 (voice) or damiani@access-board.gov.

Public Hearing on Advisory Guidelines for Aircraft Onboard Wheelchairs  
September 12, 2019, 9:30 – 4:00 (ET)
Remote attendance options will be posted soon
Access Board Conference Center
1331 F Street, NW, Suite 800
Washington, D.C.

Note: For the comfort of all participants and to promote a fragrance-free environment, attendees are requested not to use perfume, cologne, or other fragrances.