Providing Related Services to Enhance the Continuity of Learning

OSEP Webinar: Highlighting Strategies and Practices in Providing Related Services to Enhance the Continuity of Learning During COVID-19

June 29, 2020
2:00 – 3:00 PM EDT

student using assistive technology in a classroomThe Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) is hosting the second in a series of webinars focused on ready-to-use resources, tools, and practices from OSEP partners to support the educational, developmental, behavioral, and social/emotional needs of infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities through remote and distance learning.

This second webinar will focus on the provision of related services. In addition to highlighting OSEP resources, we will be joined by representatives from several of our related service national organizations. Additional information will be posted on OSEP’s COVID-19 Resource Page. 

Use this link to register for this OSEP webinar…

If you have any questions about the OSEP webinar, please contact the Webinar Series planning team at osep-meeting@air.org.

2010 Standards for Accessible Design – webinar

The Great Lakes ADA Center in collaboration with the Great Plains ADA Center is pleased to announce the availability of a 2-part webinar addressing:

Basics of the 2010 ADA Standards

US Access Board logoPart 1:   June 30, 2020  (90 minute session)
Part 2:  July 1, 2020  (90 minute session)

Time: 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm ET 

Presenter: Dave Yanchulis, Director of the Office of Technical and Information Services, U.S. Access Board

Description:

2010 Standards for Accessible Design is the standard allowed by the Department of Justice for use in new construction and alterations of facilities covered by Title II and Title III of the ADA. This 2-part free webinar session will provide an overview of changes from the previous enforceable standards, scoping and technical requirements for new construction and alterations, practical strategies to ensure ADA compliance for your building projects, and provide new tools and resources to evaluate accessibility. Individuals must attend both sessions in order to receive credit for AIA, ICC and ACTCP.

DOJ’s ADA standards (2010) became mandatory on March 15, 2012.  They include provisions that modify certain portions of Chapters 1-10, including provisions addressing the following areas:

  • Assembly Areas (221)
  • Medical Care Facilities (section 223)
  • Places of Lodging (sections 224)
  • Housing at Places of Education (224 and 233)
  • Detention and Correctional Facilities (section 232)
  • Social Service Center Establishments (233)
  • Residential Dwelling Units (section 233)

The presenters strongly recommend downloading and having the 2010 Standards available during the session. You can download from the U.S. Access Board website.

Registration:

Use this link for more information and to register. Registering for the Part 1 session automatically registers you for Part 2

Questions should be directed to webinars@adaconferences.org or by calling 877-232-1990

 

2020 Guide for Maine Families on AT and AEM Published

EducationThe Maine CITE Assistive Technology Program is pleased to release the revised Guide for Maine Families on Assistive Technology and Accessible Educational Materials. The 2020 Guide provides Maine families who have children with disabilities an easy to use resource describing how to get the assistive technology (AT) devices and services they need. Information about accessible education materials (AEM) and families’ important role in the planning process are also provided.

The 2020 Guide updates general information about AT and AEM. It includes new resources about assistive technology used during “learning at home” activities, as well as AT device demonstration and loan services – AT4Maine.org.

Use this link to download the The Guide – PDF

Happy Global Accessibility Awareness Day

Tablet showing the definition of the word "access"

Today, May 21, 2020, we celebrate the 9th anniversary of Global Accessibility Awareness Day – GAAD. Unlike previous years, when celebrations involved many face-to-face meetings and special events around the world, this year we celebrate virtually.

Check out some of the virtual events

Learn more about GAAD

Indeed the need to work and learn from home this year has intensified the importance of access for all in a powerful new way. Hopefully, now the message will be well-heard, remembered and action taken.

 

 

Audio Description Project Conference

Audio DescriptionThe American Council of the Blind (ACB) – Audio Description Project (ADP) will sponsor a Virtual Conference on July 3-10, 2020.

Here is the announcement:

This year’s Audio Description Project Conference will be held as a virtual conference (via Zoom) daily (except for Monday, July 5) starting July 3, 2020.  The cost to attend the ADP Zoom sessions will simply be the $25 fee required to register for the overarching ACB Conference.  Your $25 registration fee includes admission to all of the Audio Description Project events.

Registration will open on May 21 at 7:00 AM eastern time for ACB members and May 28 for nonmembers. Registration closes at 11:59 PM eastern time on June 21.

For more information and to register online use this link: acbconvention.org

Interested parties may also call (612) 332-3242 and select option 5 for convention. Your phone call will be returned as quickly as possible; leave your name, telephone number and time zone.

 

UMF Offers Online Certificate Program is Assistive Technology

University of Maine Farmington - logoThe University of Maine Farmington – Division of Graduate and Continuing Education has announced they are offering a graduate certificate in Assistive Technology. The new program is offered completely online.

Those completing the certificate program will be prepared to:

  • Support the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in both school and community settings.
  • Utilize assistive technology to increase independence and eliminate or  mitigate barriers.
  • Assess, design, research, and implement Assistive Technology.

The certificate in Assistive Technology (AT) prepares a broad range of professionals who can assess, design, research, and implement Assistive Technology (AT). Those completing the certificate will be prepared to support the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in both school and community settings by utilizing assistive technology to increase independence and eliminate or mitigate barriers. Courses are chosen in consultation with your academic advisor to ensure professional goals are reached and that sufficient preparation is undertaken for those seeking national certification.

For more information and to enroll, please contact the University of Maine Farmington – Graduate Studies or by phone 207.778.7502 or email gradstudies@maine.edu

Tips for Hosting Accessible Meetings with Deaf Participants

Accessibility pictogramThe National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes (NDC) has hosted a valuable set of tips for hosting meetings where some of the participants may be deaf or hard of hearing. They note, “besides running a better meeting, effective communication between hearing and deaf people has other benefits for career success. Research shows it strengthens relationships, increases well-being, and fosters meaningful participation in the workplace.”

Among the tips are recommendations regarding:

  • the use of captioning for any videos shared in the meeting,
  • the importance of providing the right accommodations – including in-person American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter, remote ASL interpreter, remote speech-to-text services, large print materials, and presentations slides as handouts with presenter notes, and
  • establishing some meeting ground rules, including taking turns, and identifying yourself before making comments.

The complete list of tips (PDF) may be downloaded from this link to the NDC website

In need of further assistance? Connect with the NDC Help Team

 

MDOE provides guidance on grading during emergency distance learning

The following announcement comes from the Maine Department of Education:

Unified Message and Recommendation Regarding Grading Practices During Emergency Distance Learning

As many School Administrative Units (SAUs) and schools move into a new phase of implementation of emergency distance learning, focusing on long term practices, many are now wading through conversations around the assessment and evaluation of learning. Some SAUs have already come to decisions around how student learning will be evaluated, if at all, and those plans vary widely, from feedback only to maintaining regular grading practices. We, the Department of Education, Maine School Boards Association, Maine School Superintendents Association, Maine Administrators of Services for Children with Disabilities, Maine Education Association, Maine Principals Association, and Maine Curriculum Leaders Association, have a deep conviction that any learning evaluation policies or practices must come from a stance of equity and compassion.

We strongly recommend that SAUs take time to thoughtfully design grading policies and practices that do no harm. Operating from a stance of equity and compassion means beginning with those most marginalized in mind when making decisions.  Even during times of regular school instruction, each and every district in the state of Maine had learners dealing with homelessness, food instability, poverty, substance use disorders, and domestic violence, among other stressful and traumatic life situations.  Now we see those situations intensifying, and new situations emerging in families that were once stable.

Any evaluation of learning must take into account the reality that many of our learners are in these circumstances. Learning in any of the circumstances noted above is almost impossible, and no student should face a failing grade, or other evaluative suffering, as a result. We encourage SAUs and regions to discuss and determine a system that holds harmless students for whom conditions are outside of their control and as best as possible prevents any further learning inequities.

Survey to collect data around learning from home

The following request/announcement comes from colleague and fellow Maine educator, Jim Moulton:

COVID-19 has dramatically altered school and learning around the world. In an effort to capture, reflect, and share the unique perspectives of students and parents as they experience learning from home in Spring 2020, two brief surveys have been created. Again – our intention is to capture, reflect, and share the unique perspectives of students and parents as they experience learning from home in Spring 2020.

The stories and experiences, collected anonymously through the surveys, will help to inform and improve current and future learning-from-home strategies. Furthermore, it is our hope that students and parents may appreciate having a place and opportunity to anonymously reflect and share their experiences during this unprecedented time.

Please share broadly with learners and families involved in learning from home due to COVID-19.

Schools and districts are encouraged to use these reflective surveys system-wide, but should contact us for best options for capturing and using the data with their local community.

If you have questions about the surveys or would like to reach out to discuss, please use the following contact information:

Jim Moulton – jim@jimmoulton.org

Jim Moulton is a former elementary educator who has been working in the field of educational technology since the mid-1990s. He has worked with educators around the world, contributed to Edutopia’s Spiral Notebook blog, and spent a decade as part of Apple’s Education Team.

Dr. Damian Bebell – bebell@bc.edu

Dr. Bebell is an educational researcher at Boston Colleges’s Lynch School of Education and Human Development. An example of his research can be seen at Drawing On Math and a current article Beyond Academics: Success and the Purpose of School.

eLearning Teaching Tips webinar from edWeb

The following announcement comes from edWeb  who is sponsoring this free webinar…

e-Learning Teaching Tips: Support for Educators During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Thursday, April 9, 2020
3:00 pm ET

Presenters

Candice Dodson, Executive Director, State Education Technology Directors Association (SETDA)
Ashley Webb, Graphic Design Teacher and Instructional Coach, Mountain Heights Academy, UT

Program Description

In support of the SETDA Coalition for eLearning, SETDA will collaborate with teachers that have extensive experience teaching online to share tips for best practices for online learning. Teachers are being asked to transform the way they teach and to meet diverse learning needs, and they need support. Join this edWebinar to hear from experienced teachers, ask questions, and share your examples as we all work to support students in this time of need.

This edWebinar will be of interest to preK through high school teachers and school leaders. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Use this link to learn more about this event and to register…