eLearning Teaching Tips webinar from edWeb

The following announcement comes from edWeb  who is sponsoring this free webinar…

e-Learning Teaching Tips: Support for Educators During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Thursday, April 9, 2020
3:00 pm ET

Presenters

Candice Dodson, Executive Director, State Education Technology Directors Association (SETDA)
Ashley Webb, Graphic Design Teacher and Instructional Coach, Mountain Heights Academy, UT

Program Description

In support of the SETDA Coalition for eLearning, SETDA will collaborate with teachers that have extensive experience teaching online to share tips for best practices for online learning. Teachers are being asked to transform the way they teach and to meet diverse learning needs, and they need support. Join this edWebinar to hear from experienced teachers, ask questions, and share your examples as we all work to support students in this time of need.

This edWebinar will be of interest to preK through high school teachers and school leaders. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Use this link to learn more about this event and to register…
 

Survey on Wireless Device User Experiences for People with Disabilities

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Inclusive Technologies (Wireless RERC) announces the launch of its 2020 Survey of User Needs (SUN). The SUN is the Wireless RERC’s cornerstone survey on wireless technology use by people with disabilities. Over 8,000 consumers have completed it with disabilities since it was first launched in 2001.

This latest version has been updated in response to changes in technology. In addition to questions about cell phone and tablet use, this latest version of the SUN collects information about wearables, “smart” home technologies, and other next-generation wirelessly connected devices. User responses will help designers and engineers make new wireless devices and services for people with disabilities. Data from the SUN also provides important information to the wireless industry, government regulators, and other researchers to help them make wireless technology more accessible and more useful to people with all types of disabilities.

If you have a disability, please consider taking this survey. If you know someone who has a disability, please forward the survey to them. Thank you!

Select this link to take the 2020 Survey of User Needs

 

Hotspot Donations and Wireless for Educators

ACTEM and all ISTE affiliates have been asked to pass along the following information from Digital Wish…

Hotspot Donations and $10/Month Wireless for Educators

With nationwide school closures due to COVID-19, nonprofits Mobile Beacon and Digital Wish have a major hotspot donation program available that can significantly increase remote connectivity for students and teachers. Visit digitalwish.org and get up to 11 donated hotspots per school. Discounted $10/month unlimited 4G LTE internet service is provided so that teachers and students can connect and learn from anywhere in the Mobile Beacon coverage area. With a lending pool of hotspots, students-in-need can access the internet to embark on a distance learning journey during isolation.

Each hotspot has unlimited, high-speed 4G LTE mobile broadband service, and can connect up to 10 people on the internet on only one plan.

This donation program is open to all public, private, and non-profit K-12 schools and universities. For higher-need schools that exceed the cap of 11 hotspots per school, behind the scenes Digital Wish is purchasing modems that will qualify for the subsidized $10/month broadband service. If you need more, please contact: Heather Chirtea 802-379-3000, heather@digitalwish.org.

Mobile Beacon is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and the second-largest Educational Broadband Service (EBS) provider in the United States. The nonprofit has been given an EBS spectrum license by the FCC, specifically to support broadband use in schools. Nonprofit Digital Wish teamed up to make the 4G LTE hotspot device donation program available to schools throughout the United States. If your schools have connectivity issues, this subsidized service will allow you to fill the gaps with wireless hotspot donations and equitably connect all students. Schools can easily create a Hotspot Lending Pool for students needing internet access at home.

Use this link to learn how to set up a lending pool...

Please share this announcement with your colleagues who are struggling to acquire access for remote students.

 

Supporting Students with IEPs During eLearning Days

With schools across the country forced into the situation of closing and providing services to students via distance education, this webinar focused on the specific educational and technical needs of students with IEPs. Particular emphasis was paid to supporting students who use Assistive Technologies (AT) and Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) and the importance of ensuring distance learning systems work effectively with these. Resources and offers for technical assistance were described.

Due to high demand and a tremendous turn out, the live session on March 23rd was not available to most who registered for the event.

The recording from edWeb is now available to view at this link

Supporting Students with IEPs During eLearning Days was presented by Christine Fox, Deputy Executive Director, SETDA; Cynthia Curry, Director, National Center on Accessible Educational Materials and the Center on Inclusive Technology & Education Systems (CITES) at CAST; and Luis Perez, Technical Assistance Specialist, National Center on Accessible Educational Materials at CAST –

“Study from Car” Initiative Starts in Maine

Network Maine logoNetworkmaine is a unit of the University of Maine System providing Maine’s Research & Education (R&E) community with access to high-bandwidth, low-latency connectivity and complimentary services that enhance their ability to successfully deliver on their missions. Founded in 2009 Networkmaine provides K-12 schools and public libraries in the state with Internet connectivity at little or no cost through the Maine School Library Network – MSLN project.

The following announcement comes from Networkmaine:

Study-From-Car Initiative

With the closure of public schools and the subsequent transition to remote learning, many schools have identified a lack of adequate Internet access in the homes of some of their students, limiting the ability of those students to participate in online learning opportunities.

Networkmaine has offered assistance to the roughly 140 local schools that have their WiFi networks provided through the Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI) in creating an additional “guest” WiFi network.  This additional WiFi network will be completely segregated from any existing network(s) at the school.  The hope is that the MLTI wireless service currently bleeds out of the building to the extent that someone could park in the parking lot and obtain service, allowing them to participate in online learning while maintaining the social distancing that the school closures are intended to facilitate. We have already heard from schools that are re-positioning their WiFi access points near exterior wall and windows to help extend the outside coverage.

We have dubbed this effort Study-From-Car as a play on the phrase work-from-home that has become so prevalent in the media.

We encourage participating schools to use the hashtag #studyfromcar if they make any announcements on social media.

Use this link for more information – and to see an interactive map where Study from Car schools are located

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Portland’s Critical Home Repair

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Portland logoHabitat for Humanity of Greater Portland’s Critical Home Repair service helps low-income homeowners make needed repairs so they can live in a safe, healthy, and affordable home. This program is part of a Habitat for Humanity’s nation-wide effort to serve homeowners who are affected by age, disability or family circumstances and struggle to maintain the integrity of their homes.

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Portland recognizes that new home construction is only a part of the solution for quality, affordable housing. The Critical Home Repair program is part of our broader community development strategy to transform and strengthen communities. It not only addresses the health, safety and affordability of the individual residences in neighborhoods, it also strengthens connections within the community and helps preserve affordable housing stock.

How it Works

The Critical Home Repair program requires an affordable payment from the homeowner for a portion of the repair costs. Applicants will be scored and ranked by level of need. Not all applications will be approved. This program serves homeowners in Cumberland County who have a household income below 80% of HUD Area Median Income.

Examples of Work to be Done

  • Roof leaks
  • Accessibility issues, ramps, etc.
  • Stair repairs
  • Structural work, not to include foundations

Work We Will Not Do

  • Mobile or modular homes (except ramps)
  • General cosmetic repairs, including but not limited to: flooring, painting, carpentry, etc.
  • Window replacement
  • Bathroom renovations or repair (only for accessibility)

Program Outline

Homeowners will apply by a deadline, and will need to demonstrate:

  • A household incomes at or below 80% of HUD median income
  • A Tax Assessment Building Value less than $200,000. They have paid their property taxes on time
  • They are current on their mortgage
  • They must own (name on title) and occupy the home and have lived in the home for over three years
  • Willingness for Habitat to conduct a credit check and background check on all residents over age 18

Scope, Costs, and Payments

Habitat will review the home for needed repairs and prepare a scope of work and price recommendation. Families will pay only a portion of the actual costs of materials and sub-contracted in-kind labor, based on their income. For example, if the materials and contracted labor are $6000, the family’s income as a percentage of Area Median Income will be the percentage of costs they pay. For example, a family of four making 30% of AMI ($23,000) will repay only 30% of repairs, or $1800. A family making $46,000 will repay 60% of repairs. Habitat will donate the balance of the project costs. Payment terms may be available.

For More Information and to Apply

Contact Molly Brake at molly@habitatme.org / 207-772-2151 ext. 104 or visit the Habitat for Humanity of Greater Portland’s Critical Home Repair website 

 

 

Tools for Living: How Technology is Transforming the Experience of Independence.

The following free webinar is sponsored by GrandCare Systems

Date And Time

Fri, February 21, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:15 PM ET

Program Description

woman using digital magnifierEvery day, 10,000 baby boomers are eligible for Medicare. Not only do 90% of today’s seniors wish to stay home for longer, we simply don’t have the physical capability nor can we afford to push the same traditional caregiving models. This is why professional caregivers and senior housing providers are turning to smart technologies to save on the costs of personal caregivers, enable independence, offset caregiver shortages and connect residents with family members.

Speakers:

  • Laura Mitchell, CEO of GrandCare, Principal at Laura Mitchell Consulting
  • Laurie Orlov, Analyst & Founder, Age in Place Technology Watch
  • Dr. Bill Thomas, Founder ChangingAging.org, the Greenhouse Project, Eden Alternative and Minka
  • Ryan Frederick, Founder & CEO, SmartLiving 360

This webinar will cover the technology ecosystem, housing models, technology in long term care vs. private homes, challenging caregiving norms and implementation best practices.

Registration

Use this link to register for the meeting and then,

Use this link to Join the online meeting:

Dial-in number (US): (425) 436-6399 Access code: 155680#

Online meeting ID: media644

road sign with word diabetes

Smartphones, “wearables” and diabetes management

ZD Net has published an interesting article about recent advances in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices that can be used with smartphones and wearable technology like the Apple Watch.

The article, Diabetes monitoring is having a smartwatch and smartphone revolution, notes the long standing problems (and expense) associated with blood glucose management in people with diabetes costing Americans $327 billion a year.

The article states:

Technology aimed at insulin-using diabetics became mainstream a few years back with the arrival of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices. These are small readers that sit on a diabetic’s body, taking their blood sugar levels constantly and relatively unobtrusively. This technology is transforming diabetes control for its users. By giving them a better view of what their blood glucose was doing, CGMs enabled insulin-dependent diabetics to take steps to keep readings in the right range.

One manufacturer of these devices Dexcom, is “… looking to exploit the potential of wearables and smartphones. Users can get their readings sent over Bluetooth Low Energy to hardware including iOS and Android phones and watches…” the article adds and ends with, “…the future of CGM is going to be tightly tied to the development of consumer tech like smartwatches or other wearables. ‘There’s a good possibility that you’re going to have even tighter integration than we have today with those types of products…'”

Read the entire article from ZD Net…

View Maine CITE’s webinar ‘Wearables’ as Assistive Technology…

 

woman using digital magnifier

New Technologies for Older Adults

From time to time we have recommended articles and blogs from Laurie Orlov’s Aging In Place Technology Watch. This one caught my eye:

Announcements of new offerings are arriving – will they/can they be used?  Hopefully these 5 will offer benefit that can and will be realized by older adults. Writers of these 2019 articles about the topic are not so sure that new technologies for this population may not be reaching their intended audience. That can be due to a variety of barriers, including fear that they are not using them properly (UCSD study), lack of internet access (which would limit awareness), low technology literacy (TechCrunch), including lack of familiarity with terminology, and physical challenges (research from MPDI). Here are five new technologies that could provide benefit to older adults – content is from the companies…

Read the whole article on Laurie’s website to learn more about these new technologies…

BTW, you can subscribe to Laurie’s blog and have new articles sent to you via e-mail! See information on her blog (upper left hand corner).

Groups Call on the FCC to Improve Quality of Live Captions

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Consumer Groups and Researchers Call on the FCC to Improve the Quality of Live Captions

Closed Captioning logoOn July 31, ten national organizations, including the National Association of the Deaf (NAD), the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA), and the Association of Late-Deafened Adults (ALDA), petitioned the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to address long-standing quality problems with captioning for live television programming. The petition was supported by the American Association of the DeafBlind (AADB).

As the petition explains, consumers routinely report serious problems with the accuracy, timing, completeness, and placement of captions on live programming, including local news, sports, and weather. The petition asks the FCC to build on its existing standards for the quality of captions by setting metrics for acceptable quality of live captions. The petition also urges the FCC to provide guidance for new captioning systems that use automatic speech recognition, which have the potential to provide captions with improved timing and lower cost but also routinely cause significant accuracy problems. Consumer groups and researchers also will be submitting additional feedback to the FCC, including an analysis of hundreds of consumer responses gathered by HLAA in a recent survey.

The FCC has asked for comments from the public about the petition. If you’ve had experiences with captions for live TV programming that you’re willing to share with the FCC, you can do so online.

Submit your comments to the FCC by September 13

Use this link to read the petition

Use this link to enter your comments online and remember to enter 05-231 in the “Proceeding(s)” field to make sure that your comment is added to the record.