Webinars June 2019 and beyond…

Maine CITE webinars in June 2019

Assistive Technology (AT) for Medication Management

Date: June 6, 2019
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 pm

medication bottle

Often a critical skill needed for living independently and maintaining health is the ability to effectively manage medications. This webinar explores available Assistive Technology (AT) devices designed to improve safety and independence for persons with disabilities and seniors to manage their meds. The presenter will outline common challenges with medication management and review numerous available and affordable AT solutions for persons of all ages, needs and abilities.

Presenter: Christine Martin, MS, OTR/L, CBIS

Use this link for more information and to register for the webinar Assistive Technology (AT) for Medication Management

‘Wearables’ as Assistive Technology

Date: July 9, 2019
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:00 PM ET

More smart watches including Apple WatchExecutive functioning describes the skills that let people plan, organize and complete tasks. Executive challenges can make it more difficult for learners to accomplish their goals, but technology can help. In this session, participants will learn about a number of smartwatches and other ‘wearables’ in order to select the device(s) that best meet their executive functioning and other access needs. Following an overview of the built-in accessibility features of these devices, participants will learn about a number of apps that can assist in improving executive functioning capabilities, including apps for managing time and information, staying on task, and more.

Presenter: Luis Perez, Ph.D.

Use this link for more information and to register for the webinar‘Wearables’ as Assistive Technology

Low Vision Technology in the Home – What Can Be Done to Increase Independence

Date: July 24, 2019
Time 1:00 – 2:00 PM ET

Screen magnifierAssistive Technology (AT) can help a person with a vision impairment live an independent, safe and meaningful life at home and in the community. Interventions include evaluating the environment for modifications to make the most of remaining vision; teaching how to use remaining vision as efficiently as possible; reducing clutter and organizing the environment; improving lighting needed for daily tasks; training to use AT in completing daily activities. Technology plays a key role in vision rehabilitation- ranging from simple to high tech devices. Assessment of appropriate technology and training consumers to use it effectively are part of the role of an OT providing low vision services. Examples of AT will be presented, including non-optical aids, magnification, video magnification, text to speech, and wearable technology.

Presenter: Sherry Boothby, OTR/L, CLVT, M.S

Use this link for more information and to register for the webinar Low Vision Technology in the Home – What Can Be Done to Increase Independence

OTHEr Webinars in June 2019

Thank you to the Center for Accessible Technology for the following list. Use this link if you wish to be on their mailing list.

Global Symbols: Design and use of symbols that reflect local language and culture from USSAAC on June 4, 2019 at 6:00 pm Eastern

5 Guidelines for Accessibility Heroes from NC-AEM
June 4, 2019 at 3:00 pm Eastern

Twice Exceptionality in the Digital Age: Strategies For helping Students Tap Into Strengths Using Innovative Technology from AbleNet
June 5, 2019, at 3:00 pm Eastern

Aided Language: from Research to Practice (AAC) from AbleNet
June 11, 2019 at 2:00 pm Eastern

Using the VPAT in Purchasing Decisions from NC-AEM
June 11, 2019  at 2:00 pm Eastern

Using Technology to Support Executive Function and Focus on the Job from PACER
June 19, 2019 at 3:00 pm Eastern

 

Change the Way You Approach Accessibility

The following free webinar announcement is from edWeb…

Change the Way You Approach Accessibility

Thursday, May 16, 2019 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm EDT

Presented by Jason Don Forsythe, Senior Solutions Engineer, Blackboard

Accessible Information TechnologyAccessibility is a topic that schools and districts continue to struggle with as learning opportunities and technologies expand our potential to reach more learners in new ways. District leaders have also begun to consider a more holistic definition of inclusivity as they modify policies, requirements, and professional-development expectations. From websites to learning management systems, we are able to create even more instructional opportunities for our students. The content we create and share must take into account this broader definition of inclusivity—learning needs, access issues, and a more mobile and diverse student population than ever before.

Attend this edWebinar to learn how to provide a more accessible and equitable learning environment and experience for all learners. We will share best practices, tips, and tools districts can use to move toward greater inclusivity. This presentation will be of interest to educational professionals, webmasters, superintendents, tech leaders, special-education coordinators, and principals. There will be time to get your questions answered at the end of the presentation.

About the Presenter

Jason Don Forsythe is a senior solutions engineer with the Blackboard K12 team. Prior to working at Blackboard, Jason worked for state government for a decade overseeing distant education initiatives, accessibility compliance, and instructional design projects. Jason resides in San Diego, CA with his wife Brandie and their three children.

Use this link for more information and to register for this webinar…

Innovative AT for Individuals with Autism

The following webinar is from edWeb…

Innovative Technology for Individuals with Autism

Thursday, May 16, 2019 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm EDT

Presented by Christian Karter, M.A., Educational Technology Specialist, Monarch Center for Autism

Program Description

iPadIndividuals with autism benefit significantly from leaps and changes in technologies. Please join Christian Karter, M.A., Educational Technology Specialist at Monarch Center for Autism to learn about the latest in technologies and apps that are being deployed to help further their education and lives. In this edWebinar, Christian will also discuss emerging technologies that are coming to the market in the next few years.

This edWebinar will be of interest to preK-12 teachers, school and district leaders, therapists, and specialists. There will be time to get your questions answered after Christian’s presentation.

About the Presenter

Christian Karter, M.A. is the educational technology specialist at Monarch Center for Autism, a division of Bellefaire JCB, in Shaker Heights, Ohio. He holds a master’s degree in community counseling and a bachelor’s degree in psychology, both from John Carroll University. He has worked at Monarch Center for Autism for 12 years as an associate teacher in the classroom and in his present role. His chief responsibilities include iPad deployment, Monarch’s PAIRS data system management, and introduction of new technologies into the classrooms.

Use this link for more information and to register…

 

Accessible Media and Services for Students

Blind person walking in mall with guide dogThe Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP) is a leading national source for accessible educational content, providing services for students who are blind, visually impaired, deaf, hard of hearing, or deaf-blind. Families and school personnel with early learners through Grade 12 students can register for free access to over 6,000 Educational Media titles on-demand and on DVD. DCMP’s Learning Center contains a wealth of information related to education, accessibility, deafness, blindness, and other related topics. DCMP provides Media Accessibility Guidelines through our Captioning Key and Description Key, used by media professionals as well as amateurs around the world.

The Described and Captioned Media Program provides premium media designed for students with disabilities and leads as a resource for families and teachers, supported by the federal Department of Education.

A recent additions to their website, Is Your Student Ready for What Comes Next? provides a set of resources to assist students in the Transition process. Some of the resources include:

  • Map It: What Comes Next is a free, online, interactive training designed for transition-aged students who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • The Getting a Job! online training was developed and designed for students who are deaf or hard of hearing and the professionals who work with them.  Focusing on the transition from school to work, the training offers a series of activities, supporting documents and topical videos designed to help the job seeker prepare for the world of work.  All the videos in the modules are presented in ASL, and are also voiced in English and captioned.

Additional videos and resources include:

  • Real Life 101: College Prep – With college just ahead of them, the hosts visit with some people who help students prepare for this milestone.
  • Real Life 101: Vocational Training – In this video a career planner discusses how to find the right career for the right person.
  • Paying Your Way Through College – This video helps viewers understand four-key financial aid sources: scholarships, grants, work-study, and student loans.
  • Biz Kid$ – Public television’s Emmy Award-winning financial education series of 65 videos for teens and preteens. Each video has a lesson guide, and the Biz Kid$ website has many additional ideas for learning activities.

Most of the resources on the website require a FREE DCMP membership which may be applied for on the site.

Partnership helps students with access

From the Franklin County, Daily Bulldog...Posted by Ben Hanstein

Robots connect UMF interns with K-12 students

Kevin Good and Hillary Goldthwait-Fowles with robotFARMINGTON – Interns at the University of Maine at Farmington have been working with students in Regional School Unit 21 this year, utilizing robots equipped with two-way communication devices in order to interact with their younger counterparts in Kennebunk.

Project Circuit is a new program supported by the Department of Education’s Maine CITE, an initiative aimed at improving access to assistive technologies for Maine students, residents and the elderly. Assistive technology is anything designed to remove barriers for a person with a disability – for students, this means improving their accessibility to programming. The UMF program is working with RSU 21 as that district is the first in the state to employ a certified assistive technology specialist, Hillary Goldthwait-Fowles. UMF interns are in instructor Kevin Good’s Assistive and Instructional Technology course, offered through the college’s Special Education program.

Good said that his course was designed to get future educators comfortable with technology like the telepresence robots. He tells his students that they are designers and makers, not just users of the technology.

“I’m pushing students to think through the process,” Good said. “I watch my students grow and change how they approach [new technology].”

The obvious use of the robot, which includes a two-way communication screen mounted on top of a wheel assembly, is to accommodate students that are unable to physically attend a class or event, Goldthwait-Fowles said. Students that are hospitalized or home-bound by an illness can continue to participate in their classes. However, there are potential uses for other disabilities as well. Students on the autism spectrum, for example, may not be able to attend a crowded event due to sensory overload. Educators may start by showing the student a copy of a class’ whiteboard, then move on to using the robot to allow the student to attend a class.

Beyond student-to-class usage, Good and Goldthwait-Fowles said, the robots also can allow others, such as the UMF interns, to work with K-12 students across the state. The system is on a secured network, Good said, but one that is globally accessible. This allows the UMF interns an earlier opportunity to work directly with K-12 students. At this point, Good likes to say, UMF can be anyplace it can send a robot.

“Anyone can access this and use this,” Goldthwait-Fowles said. While only RSU 21 has a full-time, on-site robot, others can be made available on a temporary basis for specific students.

Read the entire article at the Daily Bulldog…

UMF AT Program on Facebook…

Using Assistive Technology to Improve Reading

From EdWeb, this free webinar should be of interest to folks here in Maine…

Turn Struggling Readers Into Leaders Using Assistive Technology

Tuesday, Apr. 16 at 3 p.m. Eastern Time

EducationIn this edWebinar, join Dana Blackaby as members of her student-led “tech crew” demonstrate forms of assistive technology and share personal anecdotes describing how it helps them overcome some of their most daunting academic challenges. These students all have IEPs or 504 plans, but there are times when only the use of assistive technology allows them to overcome barriers.

Sometimes the biggest barrier to effectively utilizing assistive technology in the classroom is the teacher, as many feel they need to be experts themselves before allowing students to utilize it. When students are given the chance to showcase their expertise, however, teachers are often convinced to embrace the technology. Many teachers make students the tech experts in their classrooms. The result is that they regularly demonstrate marked improvements in their reading skills, social behavior, confidence, and public speaking, elevating them to leaders in their classrooms and schools.

This edWebinar will be of interest to elementary through middle school teachers, librarians, and school and district leaders.

Use this link for more information and to register for this webinar…

The ATP Fundamentals Course offered

ATP - RESNA logoFrom RESNA (Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America)

The RESNA ATP Fundamentals Course will continue offering public, private on-site courses, and online, instructor-led courses designed as a convenient, cost-efficient and effective way for busy AT professionals to participate.

Register for the courses in March of 2019 or use your remaining training budget to purchase training vouchers today for a seat.

This training course will help candidates review and refresh their assistive technology knowledge and help identify areas they need to study for the ATP exam.

Course features:

  • Official RESNA course materials
  • Taught by a RESNA-authorized instructor and ATP
  • Collaborate with classmates
  • Real-world learning activities and scenarios
  • Access to online practice exam – complete with diagnostic scoring
  • Copy of “Fundamentals of Assistive Technology, Vol. 4”

The 16-hour curriculum will be covered over four weeks, consisting of eight 2-hour online evening class sessions. All class sessions will be recorded for easy viewing/reviewing over the duration of the class and for 90 days after the completion of the course.

Course Cost

March 11 – April 3, 2019

  • $650 – RESNA Member
  • $800 – RESNA Non-Member

Class size is capped at 45 students to allow for maximum interaction and knowledge transfer, so seating is very limited.

Registration and More Information

Use this link for more information and to register for these courses…

New Free Module for Teacher Prep Programs

high school studentsThe following announcement comes from the Center on Technology and Disability (CTD)

CTD has created an Assistive Technology Module for Personnel Preparation Programs in participating colleges and universities and is now making it available to all educators and trainers interested in a “ resource package”. The resources can be downloaded and copied or distributed electronically at this unique link.

According to the announcement, the materials in this module will help students in teacher preparation programs:

  • Understand the basic concepts underlying the use of assistive technology.
  • Become familiar with the words and terms associated with AT.
  • Understand your role as a teacher in helping to identify and integrate the use of appropriate AT
    in your classroom.
  • Learn about the laws governing AT in public schools.
  • Participate as a knowledgeable professional in the IEP teams to which you will be assigned.
  • Become a role model, peer mentor, and school leader in the use of AT.
  • Change the lives of students with physical, sensory, cognitive, and emotional/behavioral disabilities.

In the same announcement, CTD offered another printed (PDF) resource entitled, Assistive Technology in the Classroom: Examples Designed to Help Teachers and Other School Personnel. This resource provides several case studies and offers discussion group questions for students in teacher preparation programs to use to help identify appropriate assistive technology devices and services.

Please use this link for more information and to access the resources…

 

UMF Educator Preparation Program receives national and state accreditation

Loraine Spenciner
The late Lorraine Spenciner for whom the AT Library is named, shown her holding a modified keyboard.

FARMINGTON, ME —The University of Maine at Farmington (UMF) educator preparation program is proud to announce that it has received national accreditation from the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). UMF is the first institution in the state of Maine to meet the new, rigorous national accreditation standards. UMF has also received full approval for state accreditation, including several commendations, from the Maine State Board of Education.

A longtime leader in Maine and one of the premier teacher education programs in New England, the UMF program has been noted for providing pre-service teachers with a unique educational experience that maximizes career preparation and post-graduation success.

The CAEP review recognized the UMF program for providing students with effective learning opportunities in and out of the classroom that help prepare them for a career in teaching. The UMF program passed the rigorous peer review on all five CAEP standards, which are based on the principles that its graduates are competent, caring educators and its faculty have the capacity to maintain and enhance the quality of the professional programs.

CAEP is the sole nationally recognized accrediting body for educator preparation. UMF’s accreditation runs from 2018 to 2025.

Notably, CAEP recognized UMF for its strong relationship with the community and how this mutual commitment enriches the student experience through activities, resources and support for educational improvement. In addition, the review applauded the UMF teacher preparation program for the quality of its candidates from recruitment through certification.

UMF’s teacher preparation program provides students with field experience, early and often, with student teaching, practicum and internships boasting an average of 329 students in formal placements in schools around the state annually.

These experiences prepare educators for the real classroom and create a statewide demand for UMF graduates while helping to support educational partnerships at more than 130 Maine schools annually, not including early childhood and infant centers.

According to UMF’s 2018 teacher education unit alumni survey, 84 percent of respondents indicate being employed as a teacher in the field and a majority being hired within one year of graduation. In addition, 98.9 percent of graduates responding to the survey said they were very satisfied or satisfied with the UMF program.

In its overall approval of the UMF program, the Maine State Board of Education also commended UMF for its commitment to staff its educator preparation program with full time faculty. It observed that UMF is unique in the fact that all field supervisors who mentor and oversee pre-service teachers in schools around the state are full time faculty that can model the best in professional practices.

The Maine review also commended UMF for its dedication to assistive technology within the Spenciner Curriculum Materials Center. The center, connected to the Maine Department of Education’s Maine CITE Program, houses an extensive collection of assistive technology devices such as adaptive gaming controllers and 3-D printers that are available to loan to students, educators and the general public.

These resources can help all children, including those with disabilities, succeed in the classroom. The report noted the facility is “a remarkable resource for the students, faculty, and the larger community encouraging inclusive practice with state of the art materials and equipment.”

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally recognized public liberal arts college, UMF enjoys a 150-year tradition of providing a quality academic experience combined with the personal attention and close student / faculty collaboration that help prepare all students to be successful. Rooted in a tradition of teacher preparation, UMF offers top quality programs in the arts and sciences, teacher preparation, and business and pre-professional studies. UMF is located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region and is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.

Work & Benefits Navigator Training Available

From MaineHealth Educational Services and the Maine Department of Health and Human Services…

A person receiving Social Security disability benefits or SSI has likely been told they can’t work, or if they do work that they should limit their hours. They may believe they can’t work. They may have limited work experience or education. And likely they fear losing their financial and medical safety net if they try to work.

How can a service provider encourage work for a consumer who is living this experience? What is a social service provider to do in this “Employment First” state, especially without experience in employment services?

Join a session to learn what “Work and Benefits Navigation” means, and how you can be an employment champion for your clients and your agency.

As case managers, community integration workers, DSPs, residential staff, or others with a supporting role in the life of a person with a disability, you have a critical role in the employment success of the individuals you serve.  Work and Benefits Navigation training will equip you with information, skills, and resources you need to challenge myths about work and benefits and encourage employment.

Training will be provided by Community Work Incentives Coordinators (CWICs) from Maine Medical Center’s Department of Vocational Services.  They have many years of experience in assisting people with navigating Social Security’s return-to-work rules, and encouraging them – and those who play a supporting role in their lives – to think about earnings and work in a new way.

Use this link for more information and to register for the training programs…